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CAMILLE SCHLOEFFEL

(she/her)

ABOUT

CAMILLE SCHLOEFFEL

(she/her)

Camille Schloeffel is a passionate activist for the prevention of sexual violence and promotion of sexual wellbeing. She is the Founder of The STOP Campaign, a volunteer grassroots intersectional feminist organisation addressing sexual violence in tertiary learning communities through empowerment, education, activism and awareness. Camille led The STOP Campaign as the Director and Safeguarding Manager from 2018 to the end of 2023. Under her leadership, she and her team successfully delivered the following projects:

  1. Revealing Truths and Breaking Stigmas Zine and Video Series – A collection of anonymous stories and artwork on the theme of ‘revealing truths and breaking stigmas’ created by current students from the Australian National University (ANU) who are victim-survivors or supporters, shared in the form of a printed Zine and an accompanying video series. 

  2. Reclaim the Narrative Zine and Video Series – A collection of anonymous stories and artwork on the theme of ‘reclaiming the narrative’ created by ANU current or former students who are victim-survivors or supporters, shared in the form of a printed Zine and an accompanying video series. 

  3. The Empowerment Program – Six-week program for young women, trans and non-binary people designed to cultivate growth, foster empowerment, and build a supportive community in a safe, trauma-informed environment.

  4. The College Program – Education and advocacy workshops for tertiary students in residential halls which aim to prevent sexual violence and promote sexual wellbeing.

  5. The Safe Response Toolkit – A physical and online resource for victim-survivors and their supporters that provides information about how to safely respond to sexual violence disclosures and access reporting avenues and support services.

  6. #IDeserveSafety Campaign – A social media campaign, national survey and submission to the Australian Government Universities Accord, calling on the Australian Government to establish an independent national oversight mechanism to hold universities accountable for failing to protect students from sexual violence.

 

Since graduating with a Bachelor of Development Studies and a Bachelor of Arts (Human Rights) in 2019, Camille worked in the Australian Government across sexual violence, online harms and child abuse policy areas. She is currently working in the community sector in sexual violence prevention for people with disability. In December 2023, Camille completed her Master of Social Work at the Australian Catholic University (ACU).

 

In 2020, Camille was awarded the Peter Mitchell Churchill Fellowship to explore ways activists and universities can work together to prevent sexual violence on campus, and travelled to the United States of America (USA), Canada and the United Kingdom (UK) in late-2022 to undertake this research. As a survivor herself, she is passionate about ending sexual violence in all its forms, supporting others to share their truths, building communities of care and leading collective action.

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CHURCHILL FELLOWSHIP

2020 Peter Mitchell Churchill Fellowship to explore ways activists and universities can work together to prevent sexual violence on campus.

I was awarded the Peter Mitchell Churchill Fellowship in 2020 to explore ways activists and universities can work together to prevent sexual violence on campus. In 2022, I embarked on an 11-week research journey to the USA, Canada, England and Scotland in the UK, and attended an international conference in Mexico. 

 

In my research, I focused on exploring the role of activists and the prevention methods they develop to prevent sexual violence in comparison to those developed by institutions. 

 

I also investigated how relationships between activists and institutions can be effectively built and mobilised to create change in the sexual violence space by observing and learning from:

  • Relevant university taskforces, committees and units

  • Student activists and victim-survivors who effectively campaigned for change in their university communities

  • Community organisations with direct experience in sexual violence prevention and response

  • Academics and experts who teach courses on the issue of sexual violence prevention and response and/or engage in their own activism

  • Existing campaigns, events and program sessions.

 

I conducted in-depth semi-structured interviews, observed and participated in workshops and events, shadowed leaders and attended conferences. 

 

Specifically, my research sought to find:

  • New mechanisms of preventing sexual violence on campus through collaboration between university institutions, community organisations and activists

  • Models where these collaborative relationships have been productive and influenced positive change on campus.

 

Importantly, my goal is to ensure that this project benefits the Australian community by:

  • Providing best practice examples of positive collaboration between activists and institutions

  • Leveraging grassroots advocacy and activism, including my own experience, to inspire institutions to listen to students and enact substantial policy reform in their efforts to prevent sexual violence

  • Preventing sexual violence from occurring and keep everyone safe on university campuses.

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